Hemorrhage is a leading cause of death in traumatic injuries, ranking fourth in the United States at a total cost of $671 billion in 2013. Working with an interdisciplinary team involving collaborators from Assiut University in Egypt, Texas A&M University chemist Karen Wooley’s research group has developed a bioabsorbable wound dressing featuring encapsulated chitosan nanofibers within a sugar-based hydrogel that dissolves in as little as seven days, leaving behind a significantly larger available wound-healing surface while eliminating the need for subsequent physical removal.

Texas A&M Chemists Develop Nanoscale Bioabsorbable Wound Dressing

May 24, 2019
“Bioabsorbable wound dressings that can be applied and left in the injury site are desirable for a variety of blood loss scenarios -- for example, to control bleeding in traumatic injuries and to save lives on both civilian and military fronts. The composite materials we’ve developed are malleable and could be easily administered to wound sites. They have also performed significantly better in terms of reducing the amount of blood loss and the time required to achieve hemostasis against commercially available bioabsorbable wound dressing in several animal models.”
Eric Leonhardt, Texas A&M chemistry Ph.D. student