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(Credit: Laura DeMarco.)

COLLEGE STATION --

Laura DeMarco, professor of mathematics at Northwestern University, will visit the Texas A&M University campus next week to deliver the 2019 Sue Geller Undergraduate Lecture, the fourth in an annual series intended to educate and inspire students in the Texas A&M Department of Mathematics.

DeMarco, a recognized expert in dynamical systems, complex analysis and arithmetic geometry, will present "The Mandelbrot Set: What We Know Today" on Tuesday (March 19) at 6 p.m. in Room 117 of the John R. Blocker Building. The event will be preceded by a reception at 5:30 p.m. and followed by a brief discussion opportunity from 7 to 7:30 p.m.

Despite the Mandelbrot set being one of the most famous objects in modern mathematics, DeMarco says it's still not fully understood. Her lecture will explore results stemming from it, spanning its initial discovery to present day.

A member of the Northwestern faculty since 2014, DeMarco earned her Ph.D. in mathematics from the Harvard University in 2002. Prior to Northwestern, she held faculty positions at the University of Illinois at Chicago (2007-2014) and the University of Chicago (2002-2007), where she was the L.E. Dickson Instructor. She also served as a visiting professor at the University of Michigan (fall 2015) and Stony Brook University (spring 2016) as a Simons Foundation Fellow.

In addition to organizing the National Science Foundation-sponsored GROW (Graduate Research Opportunities for Women) undergraduate conference, DeMarco has supervised numerous undergraduate research projects. A fellow of the American Mathematical Society, she has received the 2017 Ruth Lyttle Satter Prize and was an invited speaker at the 2018 International Congress of Mathematicians. She is a member of the editorial board for the Journal of the American Mathematical Society, Journal of Modern Dynamics and AMS Journal of Conformal Geometry and Dynamics.

Dr. Michael Anshelevich, Texas A&M professor of mathematics and event organizer, notes that the lecture series was founded in 2016 as the Mathematics Undergraduate Research Lecture to provide a venue for undergraduate students to interact with leading researchers from outside Texas A&M who have also demonstrated a deep interest in and capacity for student mentoring. It was renamed in 2018 to honor Dr. Sue Geller, a longtime Texas A&M mathematician as well as the founder and longtime director of Texas A&M Mathematics Honors, the first department-level honors program at Texas A&M. Known to students as Dr. Sue, Geller has supervised more than 100 masters students and has mentored an uncountable (although finite) number of undergraduates. Her honors include the Ron Barnes Distinguished Service to Students Award from the Texas section of the Mathematical Association of America and the Texas A&M University Distinguished Service Award in Individual Student Relationships.

For additional information about the lecture, visit the Geller Undergraduate Lecture Series homepage.

To learn more about undergraduate research in the Texas A&M Department of Mathematics, go to http://www.math.tamu.edu/undergraduate/research/.

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-aTm-

Contact: Shana Hutchins, (979) 862-1237 or shutchins@science.tamu.edu or Dr. Michael Anshelevich, (979) 845-3261 or manshel@math.tamu.edu

Hutchins Shana

  • Laura DeMarco

    (Credit: Laura DeMarco.)

  • Despite the Mandelbrot set being one of the most famous objects in modern mathematics, Northwestern's Laura DeMarco says it's still not fully understood. Her March 19 Texas A&M lecture will explore results stemming from it, spanning its initial discovery to present day.

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