-->

COLLEGE STATION --

Sometimes, Texas A&M University statistics graduate student Minsuk Shin '16 is hard-pressed to answer whether he chose statistics or if it chose him.

During his freshman year at Yonsei University in his native Seoul, South Korea, Shin discovered he had an uncanny skill with numbers and probability. While his grades in other classes admittedly were not stellar, his interest in mathematics produced better results in an "Introduction to Statistics" course. After earning high marks in that course, Shin decided to follow his intuition and pursue further studies in that area. He completed his undergraduate studies and eventually a master's degree in statistics at Yonsei and then enrolled in the doctoral program in the Texas A&M Department of Statistics in 2012.

Now in his fourth year at Texas A&M, Shin is a research assistant under Professor and Department Head Valen E. Johnson and is utilizing the strengths he honed at Yonsei to their fullest by researching Bayesian model selection and computational algorithms. Shin says he remains captivated by the power of data and its ability to unlock countless secrets about the world.

"Everything in Bayesian statistics can be explained by one single theorem, a Bayes theorem," Shin said. "I found that it's kind of beautiful, and also, it has very strong coherence."

Watch an interview with Shin in which he discusses his work with Bayesian statistics and what it means to him and society:



Named for 18th century English mathematician Thomas Bayes, Bayesian logic is a branch of inferential statistics that deals with probability inference. Bayesian statistical methods are used to calculate a probability distribution of parameters in a statistical model, using data and previous knowledge of those parameters. This technique has become a popular analytical tool in recent years in diverse industries, from business and government to technology and medicine.

"It's a very practical study," Shin said. "If you learn statistics, then you can apply what you learn directly to the real data, so that's really an amazing thing when you study statistics."

Shin has come into his own under Johnson's tutelage, having already published three papers on Bayesian methodology and with several more in the works. Johnson said Shin's potential as a statistician was evident from the moment he met him in a statistics course he was teaching during Shin's first year at Texas A&M.

"It was clear from that class that Minsuk was one of the most talented students we had in the program," Johnson said. "He asked lots and lots of questions as I was going through the course material, and you could tell from his questions he was understanding the basic concepts and was challenging the concepts."

Widely regarded as one of the premier statistics programs in the nation, Texas A&M Statistics is world-renowned, both for the strength of its faculty and its innovative graduate curriculum that includes two dynamic distance options, the Masters of Science in Statistics Online Degree and the Masters of Science in Analytics programs. For Shin, the decision to enroll at Texas A&M was a no-brainer.

"Texas A&M's statistiics department's program is one of the best in America," Shin said. "That's the reason why I chose Texas A&M."

To learn more about the Texas A&M Department of Statistics, visit http://www.stat.tamu.edu.

# # # # # # # # # #

About Research at Texas A&M University: As one of the world's leading research institutions, Texas A&M is at the forefront in making significant contributions to the storehouse of knowledge, including that of science and technology. Research conducted at Texas A&M represented annual expenditures of more than $820 million in FY 2013, ranking Texas A&M in the top 20 of the National Science Foundation's most recent survey of research and development expenditures among U.S. colleges and universities. Recently reported FY 2014 research expenditures exceed $854 million. That research creates new knowledge that provides basic, fundamental and applied contributions resulting in many cases in economic benefits to the state, nation and world. To learn more, visit http://research.tamu.edu.

-aTm-

Contact: Chris Jarvis, (979) 845-7246 or cjarvis@science.tamu.edu or Dr. Valen E. Johnson, (979) 845-3141 or vjohnson@stat.tamu.edu

Jarvis Chris

  • As an undergraduate student in South Korea, Texas A&M graduate student Minsuk Shin '16 found his future in statistics. In 2012, he found a home in the Texas A&M Department of Statistics.

  • Texas A&M Statistics professor and head Valen E. Johnson says Shin's potential as a statistician was evident from the moment he met him in a statistics course he was teaching during Shin's first year at Texas A&M.

  • "It's a very practical study. If you learn statistics, then you can apply what you learn directly to the real data, so that's really an amazing thing when you study statistics." -- Minsuk Shin '16

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
© Texas A&M University. To request use of any of our photographs for educational use or to view additional options from our archive, please contact the College of Science Communications Office.

College of Science
517 Blocker
TAMU 3257 | 979-845-7361
Site Policies
Contact Webmaster
Social Media